The Public Archive

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January 1, 2014 at 2:18pm
5 notes
The Commander in Chief, Jean-Jacques Dessalines, to the People of Hayti, Gonaives, January 1, 1804
It is not enough to have expelled the barbarians who have bloodied our land for two centuries; it is not enough to have restrained those ever-evolving factions that one after another mocked the specter of liberty that France dangled before you. We must, with one last act of national authority, forever assure the empire of liberty in the country of our birth; we must take any hope of re-enslaving us away from the inhuman government that for so long kept us in the most humiliating torpor. In the end we must live independent or die…

The Commander in Chief, Jean-Jacques Dessalines, to the People of Hayti, Gonaives, January 1, 1804

It is not enough to have expelled the barbarians who have bloodied our land for two centuries; it is not enough to have restrained those ever-evolving factions that one after another mocked the specter of liberty that France dangled before you. We must, with one last act of national authority, forever assure the empire of liberty in the country of our birth; we must take any hope of re-enslaving us away from the inhuman government that for so long kept us in the most humiliating torpor. In the end we must live independent or die…

December 27, 2013 at 12:42am
2 notes
10 Books for 2013
A couple of caveats concerning our list of ten notable books for 2013: we’ve listed more than ten books and not all of them were published in 2013. While some of the texts mentioned below come from 2012, others were published as early as the 1930s. We also have a stack of excellent recent titles that didn’t make the list but certainly deserve a mention… [read more].

10 Books for 2013

A couple of caveats concerning our list of ten notable books for 2013: we’ve listed more than ten books and not all of them were published in 2013. While some of the texts mentioned below come from 2012, others were published as early as the 1930s. We also have a stack of excellent recent titles that didn’t make the list but certainly deserve a mention… [read more].

12:39am
162 notes
Reblogged from manufactoriel
manufactoriel:

 South African  Nazism by Jean Michel Basquiat

manufactoriel:

 South African  Nazism by Jean Michel Basquiat

December 8, 2013 at 1:15pm
747 notes
Reblogged from schomburgcenter
schomburgcenter:


On this day, 52 years ago, Frantz Fanon passed away. A psychiatrist, Pan-Africanist, writer, and revolutionary, he was born in Martinique in 1925. In 1952 he published “Black Skin, White Masks,” which exposed the negative effects of colonization on the mental state of subjugated people. As a psychiatrist in Algeria, he joined the FLN (National Liberation Front), which waged a war of independence against France. In 1961, Fanon published The Wretched of the Earth, a book on decolonization that has remained a classic and has influenced revolutionaries the world over, including Malcolm X, the Black Panthers, Che Guevara, and Steve Biko, founder of the Black Consciousness movement. Fanon died in Maryland, where he had sought treatment for leukemia, and was buried in Algeria.
Photo Credit: NYPL

schomburgcenter:

On this day, 52 years ago, Frantz Fanon passed away. A psychiatrist, Pan-Africanist, writer, and revolutionary, he was born in Martinique in 1925. In 1952 he published “Black Skin, White Masks,” which exposed the negative effects of colonization on the mental state of subjugated people. As a psychiatrist in Algeria, he joined the FLN (National Liberation Front), which waged a war of independence against France. In 1961, Fanon published The Wretched of the Earth, a book on decolonization that has remained a classic and has influenced revolutionaries the world over, including Malcolm X, the Black Panthers, Che Guevara, and Steve Biko, founder of the Black Consciousness movement. Fanon died in Maryland, where he had sought treatment for leukemia, and was buried in Algeria.

Photo Credit: NYPL

December 3, 2013 at 7:01pm
7 notes

Haitiano/Haitian

You are Haitian
you are Haitian by being Black
you are Black
that makes you Haitian
not by birth
By being black
You are Black
Black is bad
Bad is Haitian
Black is ugly
Ugly is Haitian
You are Haitian
By being Black you are Haitian

Blas R. Jimenez, “Haitiano,” (1980). h/t: tifanmkreyol

Haitiano/Haitian

You are Haitian
you are Haitian by being Black
you are Black
that makes you Haitian
not by birth
By being black
You are Black
Black is bad
Bad is Haitian
Black is ugly
Ugly is Haitian
You are Haitian
By being Black you are Haitian

Blas R. Jimenez, “Haitiano,” (1980). h/t: tifanmkreyol

November 16, 2013 at 7:05pm
0 notes
“You lied to defame Dominican, Republic! Stop or you’ll taste our medicine!”: A letter to the Editor
The Public Archive is always happy to receive letters to the editor like the one below which, we think, provides a stark example of how history has been twisted to the cause of anti-Haitianism while providing an unadorned, even brutal, representation of the ideological context of the recent ruling of the Dominican Republic’s Constitutional Tribunal regarding its citizens of Haitian descent… click for more.

“You lied to defame Dominican, Republic! Stop or you’ll taste our medicine!”: A letter to the Editor

The Public Archive is always happy to receive letters to the editor like the one below which, we think, provides a stark example of how history has been twisted to the cause of anti-Haitianism while providing an unadorned, even brutal, representation of the ideological context of the recent ruling of the Dominican Republic’s Constitutional Tribunal regarding its citizens of Haitian descent… click for more.

2:01pm
62 notes
Reblogged from rs620

Where once Black culture could be evoked for its oppositional relationship to the capitalist market, on one hand, and the racial state, on the other, now it has been defanged, denuded of dissident valence, and repurposed for the expansion of markets and the neutralization of progressive Black politics. The noble plea for the incorporation of difference has become the celebratory promotion of Difference, Incorporated while the improved conditions of Black representation (at least in certain visible areas) have had little effect on improving the actual conditions of Black life.

Given these contemporary conditions, we would do well to ask if recourse to culture still provides the necessary critical apparatus for thinking about the paradoxes and “predicaments” of Blackness and of the African Diaspora? Culture, of course, will always be with us in one form or another – it is precisely its malleability and openness that makes it so attractive and analytically productive. Yet if all is culture, is culture all? And can what is arguably the hegemony of culture in African Diaspora studies be displaced in favor of other analytics and approaches?

One way around the apparent hegemony of culture is through the development of what I’m calling a “corporate turn” in African Diaspora studies. The corporate turn could mark a renewed attention to the institutions, individuals, and entities of exchange and exploitation that have forged the structural contexts in which black identity, the conditions of black life and, ultimately, Black culture, have emerged. The corporate turn calls for the reincorporation of political economy and business and economic history with African Diaspora studies and it demands that we take seriously the institutional history of what Cedric Robinson has termed “racial capitalism”: the simultaneous, and intertwined emergence of white supremacy and capitalism in the modern world.

— Dr. Peter James Hudson, “African Diaspora Studies and the Corporate Turn” (via hagereseb)

November 5, 2013 at 2:47am
10 notes
Reblogged from rs620

hagereseb:

It’s painfully ironic that the Association for the Study of the Worldwide African Diaspora is holding their conference on Black Diaspora studies this weekend in the Dominican Republic, just a few weeks after the country ruled nearly 200,000 Dominicans of Haitian descent stateless.

October 13, 2013 at 11:32am
186 notes
Reblogged from amnhnyc
amnhnyc:

A Bella Coola mask representing the Sun - Hall of Northwest Coast Indians
(via AMNH on Instagram)

amnhnyc:

A Bella Coola mask representing the Sun - Hall of Northwest Coast Indians

(via AMNH on Instagram)

(via profkew)

October 12, 2013 at 11:28am
4 notes
Haiti, Antihaitianismo, and the Dominican Republic
On September 23, 2013, the Constitutional Court of the Dominican Republic ruled that the children of “irregular” migrants born in the Dominican Republic after June 21st, 1929 would be stripped of their Dominican citizenship. The ruling – which could render 250,000 Dominicans of Haitian descent stateless – came as a result of a challenge by Juliana Deguis Pierre against the Dominican Electoral Board. The Electoral Board refused to issue Pierre an identification card. They argued that although she was born in the “national territory,” because she was the daughter of migrants in transit she did not have the right to Dominican citizenship. They based their ruling on article 11.1 of the Dominican Constitution of November 29, 1966 which held sway when Pierre was born. Read more…

Haiti, Antihaitianismo, and the Dominican Republic

On September 23, 2013, the Constitutional Court of the Dominican Republic ruled that the children of “irregular” migrants born in the Dominican Republic after June 21st, 1929 would be stripped of their Dominican citizenship. The ruling – which could render 250,000 Dominicans of Haitian descent stateless – came as a result of a challenge by Juliana Deguis Pierre against the Dominican Electoral Board. The Electoral Board refused to issue Pierre an identification card. They argued that although she was born in the “national territory,” because she was the daughter of migrants in transit she did not have the right to Dominican citizenship. They based their ruling on article 11.1 of the Dominican Constitution of November 29, 1966 which held sway when Pierre was born. Read more…